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The Vincent Price Collection II (Blu-ray Review)

Vincent Price Collection IILast October, Scream Factory ghoulishly delighted everyone for Halloween with the release of The Vincent Price Collection.  Six of the iconic horror actor’s works in one set with some definite gems of bonus features.  Of those, there were the introductions and parting words for many of the films from the Iowa PBS archives from the 80s that had price discussing each film before and after it in a haunting library like setting.  This year, Scream Factory is back with another volume of Price, up’ing the ante to now seven titles.  This box set also has more commercially appealing titles to it as well, as it contains classics like The Raven, The House On Haunted Hill, Return Of The Fly, The Comedy Of Terrors and The Last Man On Earth to name some.  It is with great pleasure that I return to these and share my experience.

Raven 1

The Raven (1963) 

During the 15th century, a sorcerer named Erasmus Craven has been morning the death of his wife for two years.  He is visited one night by a raven who turns out to be a wizard he knows named Dr. Bedlo.  Bedlo had been transformed in a duel by Dr. Scarabus and claims to have seen the ghost of Craven’s late wife during that trip.  Craven, his daughter along with Dr. Bedlo and his son pack up and head to Dr. Scarabus castle to confront him and see if they can find the ghost of Craven’s wife, Lenore.

Corman’s fifth entry in the Poe series is one based of such a short poem.  “The Raven” however, was one of the most popular and noteworthy ones that the title alone would sell it.  And writer Robert Matheson does his best twist the poem itself and aspects of it into the story.  There was also a decision to take this horror story in a more comedic direction than the previous films.  Many a fan did not like this angle at the time and thought it shamed the original work.  However, time has been kind and many seem to understand and appreciate the tone.

I’m going to talk about it in the next movie as well, but this is a pretty stellar all-star cast of horror legends from the past right in one film.  You get Vincent Price, Peter Lorre and Boris Karloff.  On top of that Vincent Price and Boris Karloff square off in a battle of sorcery, and super groovy 60s effects, at the climax of the film.  Want more?  How about we throw in a very young Jack Nicholson to the mix.  Nicholson got his start doing films through the works of Roger Corman and this is one of those films.  Its amazing to think of all the directors and talent Jack has worked with in all his years, and this movie alone has three legendary iconic actors by itself.

The Raven isn’t too long and its definitely a treat.  The comedy in the film is solid, but I think would be done better one film from now.  More or less, if you take the starstruck factor of all the people in this movie out, its a pretty so-so affair in the middle of the film until the climax.  Most of this film’s notoriety comes from its association with the Poe poem that it loosely has much of anything to do with.  There are funny moments, but there’s not really a whole lot going to the plot of the film to keep entirely invested aside from the humor, which everyone is pretty good at bringing their own flavor.

Raven 4

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Clarity/Detail:  This is a pretty clean print used for the film.  Detail is solid and the image is a tad softer.  Most of that has to do with the nature of how it was shot.  For instance, there are some shots that appear blurry, for which there’s not much the transfer can do with it aside from displaying its blurriness.

Depth:  Most of this is interior but during the final battle you get a great sense of space from foreground to background.

Black Levels:  Blacks take a dark and natural tone.

Color Reproduction:  Those beautiful 60s pastels pop.  Colors are especially groovy during the light show of a finale.

Flesh Tones:  Flesh tones are lifelike and for the most part consistent.  Facial details become more apparent the closer the shot.

Noise/Artifacts:  There might be a spec here or there, but this one is surprisingly clean.

Raven 3

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  There’s an ever so slight analog his in the source, but that’s part of the charm.  A good balance comes across between sound, voice and score.  Effects are distinct and well represented.  At a few points the score sounds a little hampered by its analog nature, but those moments are few and far between.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Dialogue is clean, clear and audible.

Raven 2

Extras 

This set also comes with a booklet featuring an essay by historian David Del Valle and many rare photos and posters for the films in the set

Introduction / Parting Words From Vincent Price (HD, 3:45/2:28)

Audio Commentary

  • With Film Historian Steve Haberman 

Richard Matheson: Storyteller – The Raven (HD, 6:37) – The writer discusses his work on The Raven.  In a funny aside, he discusses how he decided to make it a comedy because he thought it was a joke to be making a movie from such a short poem.

Corman’s Comedy Of Poe (HD, 8:13) – A vintage featurette with Roger Corman and Co talking about adapting the short poem and making a horror-comedy.

Promotional Record (HD, 5:41) – An vinyl recording that has the cast reading the poem.

Theatrical Trailer (HD, 2:26)

Still Gallery – 67 images of promotional photos, lobby cards and posters.

Comedy Of Terrors 2

The Comedy Of Terrors (1963) 

Waldo Trumbull, the town undertaker, and his assistant Felix Gillie are a pair of scheming con artists.  Their business only has one or a few coffins.  Following the funeral processions, they dump the body in the plot and reuse the coffin to save cost.  Times are slow and Trumbull’s landlord is barking down at him for money.  Since there are no customers, Trumbull and Gillie decide to take it upon themselves to make their own customer by murdering them.  Their first one goes ary when the heirs move out of town and forget to pay.  Killing two birds with one stone, Trumbull thinks it best to make their money grubbing landlord their next customer.

Another comedy with a cast similar to The Raven makes this first disc of the set really complimentary of itself.  Vincent Price, Peter Lorre and Boris Karloff are this time joined by Basil Rathbone and in his last role captured on celluloid, Joe E. Brown.  The film’s title is a play on the film Tales Of Terror for which they had all starred in previous to this.  This is just an all star little group going film to film at this time and its really a lot of fun.  Price and Lorre prove once again to be a bit of an underrated little comedic duo in these horror films as they play so well with each other.  Lorre was known for plenty of improv’d lines to which Price loved to play off of.  In these situations Lorre is usually some little weirdo minion character and Price is in somewhat arrogant bossy control over him.

The humor and storyline of The Comedy Of Terrors feels a lot more fresh and original compared to that in The Raven.  I really enjoyed the whole undertaker aspect of it.  While this is a period piece like the other Corman films it doesn’t necessarily feel constrained by it.  Its also not really tied to any known works, so its allowed to breathe and be itself.  And to be honest, there were some good laugh out loud moments, and some that just made you appreciate how clever it was.  The film didn’t resonate to well with theater goers, just making a little over its money back.  Writer Richard Matheson said of this “Terror sells and comedy makes them go away, so its like they’re walking in two directions at once.”

Comedy Of Terrors 3

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Clarity/Detail:  This film is in a little bit rougher shape than The Raven, but is more the kind of print you expect with one of these.  However, clarity is quite good and detail more than average.  You can really make out good detail on wood surfaces and the dirt and cobble roads.

Depth:  Above average.  The kitchen and cellar scenes really give a 3 dimensional feel between character and environment.

Black Levels:  Blacks are pretty dark and a little consuming.  The darker an area is, the more scratchy and grainy the picture becomes.  Some detail is masked but not much.

Color Reproduction:  Colors sway the way of natural.  A lot of this film deals in browns and more tame muted colors.

Flesh Tones:  Consistent with solid detail.  A little flickering occurs during some fades.

Noise/Artifacts:  There are plenty of specs in this one as well as scratches.  The opening titles also appear a little rough.  I tend to think this sort of stuff gives character, but some purists will disagree completely with me.

Comedy Of Terrors 1

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  Similar to The Raven, there’s a light analog hiss, accompanied by a good balance in voice, sound, score and occasionally source drawn peaking at high pitched moments.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Dialogue is clear and loud.

Comedy Of Terrors 4

Extras 

Introduction/Parting Words With Vincent Price (HD, 3:40, 2:00)

Richard Matheson: Storyteller – The Comedy Of Terrors (HD, 9:35) – The writer discusses his penchant for writing some horror comedy and talks about the set of the film during shooting.

Theatrical Trailer (HD, 2:32)

Still Gallery – 38 promotional images, lobby cards and posters.

Tomb Of Ligeia 2

Tomb Of Ligeia (1964) 

Once again, Vincent Price plays a man who has recently lost his wife.  Although this time he his haunted by what he feels is her reluctance to die.  A recluse, Verdon Fell also has a strange condition which makes him wear these really big and dark glasses when out in the daytime.  By chance, he meets a strongheaded woman and marries her.  But oh, the spirit of his late wife is that of a vengeful one and she decides to make life in the house a little bit hellish.

When the first Vincent Price set came out last year, this was one of the titles people so badly wanted to be a part of it.  Its considered the very best of the Roger Corman/Vincent Price/Edgar Allan Poe film productions in the American International Pictures era.  This is also the final film in the Poe run from Corman.  By then, things were losing steam.  So while looked back fondly upon, it made the least amount of money of any of the adaptations.

Corman decided to more or less go “all out” for this one last shebang.  Instead of his normal penchant for using the same sets and keeping things to a sound stage, Corman opted to shoot exterior scenes on location.  This sort of gives the effect of loosening ones collar when watching all of the films.  The first scenes feels like something of a breath of fresh air when you can see an organic background.  There’s also some cool settings like a real ruinous place where Verdon Fell happens to come across the woman he’d later marry in the story.  The interiors also don’t feel like the same ‘ol same ‘ol as well.  For being one last effort, it sure feels like a step in a new direction.

Price wasn’t the first choice for the film and Corman didn’t want to cast him at all.  But, American International Pictures said, “Price or no picture”, so they did their best to make him youthful.  And I mean, c’mon Roger, you guys started this together, you have to end together.  This is definitely one of the stronger films of the Poe series, with a creepy poltergeist deviously eating up the thrills and chills.  Its also a unique film in that you aren’t sure what direction its taking, or what exactly you’re watching at times and then it catches you off guard.  The film is a lot of fun and really sends the Roger Corman/Vincent Price/Edgar Allan Poe trifecta out on a high note.

Tomb Of Ligeia 3

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Clarity/Detail:  Ligeia features a nice solid transfer with plenty of detail.  Its a crisper and a bit cleaner image.  Its not going to set the world on fire, but its clearly the best the film has ever looked.

Depth:  Highlight moments were in the ruins as well as the fiery finale.

Black Levels:  Blacks are solid and help to accentuate detail and sharpness.

Color Reproduction:  Colors are good and pop in areas.  Much of it takes on a more lifelike look.  Greens are a highlight color.  Some interior scenes prove to carry a rich bit of color that does pop, even if it is some very nice grays for the most part.

Flesh Tones:  Solid and consistent.  Facial detail is high in closeups and decent in medium shots.

Noise/Artifacts:  Pretty clean.  Usual light grain, specs and some scratches are abound.

Tomb Of Ligeia 4

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  A light analog hiss accompanies a pretty clean and distinct track.  There is a nice variance between dialogue, effects and score.  The fire at the end as well as some more jumpy action scenes provide a nice palette of volumes for scares.  Also the score gets pretty effective and thunderous in areas.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Clean, loud and crisp.

Tomb Of Ligeia 1

Extras 

Introduction/Parting Words With Vincent Price (HD, 3:04/2:12)

Audio Commentary

  • With Producer/Director Roger Corman
  • With Elizabeth Shepherd
  • With Film Historian Constantine Nash

Theatrical Trailer (HD, 2:28)

Still Gallery – 28 promotional images, lobby cards and posters.

Last Man On Earth 1

The Last Man On Earth (1964) 

Robert Morgan lives every day the same.  Wake up, get ready, eat breakfast, go kill vampires.  Come home before sundown, sleep, repeat.  He’s what appears to be the last remaining human on Earth.  A plague has wiped everyone out and turned them into vampires.  Morgan finds himself to be immune and thinks his blood is key to a cure.  His life is a simple, though challenging, and a very cautious one.  But, things change forever once he discovers a perfectly normal woman spying upon him.

The Last Man On Earth is one of Vincent Price’s most famous, celebrated and influential films.   This legendary tale comes from a celebrated novel by Richard Matheson (who has also written some films in this box set) called I Am Legend.  I Am Legend has been adapted to film on two occasions aside from this one.  Most obviously folks will recall the 2007 film with Will Smith that shares the title with the novel.  A film that many of us just went opening weekend to see some new footage from The Dark Knight.  Also, a very cool cult film with Charlton Heston was made from the novel called The Omega Man.  Which one is best?  How about all of them are pretty fun in their own right.

Fans of zombies may see some big time similarities between the vampires of this film and those creatures.  You’ll have to remember, George Romero’s Night Of The Living Dead was still four years away from entering the movie world’s conscious.  Zombies before that were more akin to what you see in something like White Zombie and the like.  Romero has even gone on record stating that his inspiration for his creation came from the book and this movie.  And watching the film, its more than readily apparent.  While called vampires, it basically is what would become the zombie as we know it.

I’m a really big fan of this film and its one of my all time favorite Vincent Price movies.  I’m a sucker for A) zombie/vampire stuff and B) the whole “wandering the empty post apocalyptic Earth” kind of genre.  This is surely an early entry in that, so its crafting a lot of the tropes.  Strongly though, I think it still manages to hold up quite well and be just as effective narratively as anything out there in the current market.  Its also got such a dour memorable finish like many of its counterparts would adapt.  Having this film in the box set is an easy highlight to this Blu-ray collection.

Last Man On Earth 2

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Clarity/Detail:  The Last Man On Earth comes with a sharp and solidly detailed image.  Detail on fabrics and surfaces like Robert’s car are quite apparent.  I’ve seen more impressive black and white transfers, but this one is no slouch.

Depth:  Its on the flatter side of things, but its not without some impressive moments.  Like the iconic moment of him wandering down the long row of stairs.

Black Levels:  Blacks are natural and kept to help sharpen and detail the image.

Color Reproduction: N/A

Flesh Tones: N/A

Noise/Artifacts:  Pretty clean, maybe some specs here or there.

Last Man On Earth 4

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  The audio has some impressive and well rounded moments with the action.  Balance is key here.  This is mostly dialogue-heavy and its covered very well.  Accentuating everything in a lovely fashion is the score which always compliments and never interferes.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Crisp and clean.

Last Man On Earth 3

Extras 

Audio Commentary

  • With Film Historian David Del Valle And Author Derek Botelho

Richard Matheson: Storyteller – The Last Man On Earth (HD, 6:24) – Another piece from this interview with Richard Matheson focuses on The Last Man On Earth.

Still Gallery – 66 lobby cards, posters and promotional images.

Dr Phibes Rises Again 2

Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972) 

Three years following the events of the first film, Dr. Phibes is awaken from his hibernation with the intention of awakening his wife from her eternal slumber.  He finds his home has been demolished and his papyrus scrolls that would lead him to the River Of Life are missing.  Phibes discovers the thieves who took the scrolls and follows them to Egypt, where he was planning on traveling all along.  One by one, he picks up his murdering spree as he gets closer and closer to the scrolls that will help bring he and his wife to eternal life and happiness.

The second Phibes movie is still solid, but truly a step down from the original.  This one kind of ditches a lot of the horror and suspense that led the first one and goes for more of an “adventure” movie feel.  The film still has some really cool kills and death trap scenes, but those are the only part of it that sort of strongly feel like this was once a horror film.  I’d still put it in the category, but this is the kind of horror similar to Stephen Sommers Mummy films than something for big time scares.  I still really enjoy the look and style of the film.  There are some excellent outfits, sets and photography going on in this film.  There are some absolutely beautiful tunnel shots in here as well.

Vincent Price picks up right were he left off in the first one, as if they just starting shooting this the very next day.  While they did something very unique with his vocal performance in the last one and it felt very special whenever Phibes communicated, this time they sort of don’t want to go with that.  He speaks a ton in the movie and doesn’t have to play a special recording, just plug a thing into his neck.  Price does however inject a lot of dark and twisted humor into the film.  There’s a terrific moment where he’s eating fish via a hole in the back of his neck and he begins choking, which results in him pulling a bone from his neck.  In what seems like a missed opportunity, Peter Cushing shows up, but he and price really don’t share much of the screen together.

Rising again wasn’t a bad thing for Dr. Phibes.  This is still a really solid film that continues the mythology of the character and pits him in a completely different scenario with new goals.  It plays as an adventure film and injects more humor into the story.  However, its only crime really is not living up to the first movie and that’s just fine.  The first is a brilliant movie that’s really hard for any to live up to.  This is another adventure with one of Vincent Price’s best characters, featuring plenty of good filmmaking in terms of photography and effects, and that’s a good thing.

Dr Phibes Rises Again 1

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1

Clarity/Detail:  I really liked the transfer on this one.  Its pretty sharp and retains a lot of detail.  You can make out a great deal of sand on a lot of things.  There is also a great amount of detail on objects within rooms as well as surfaces of walls and flooring.  Water also is translated quite nicely into this mix.

Depth:  There are some nifty shots of the desert in terms of getting  sense of space and distance.  Its a bit average with a few impressive moments.

Black Levels:  Blacks are a little lighter, but manage to accentuate detail and help with sharpness.

Color Reproduction: While they go to the desert and that takes a lot of the color palette out of the equation, pre-Egypt there are some really nice poppy colors that shine through quite well.

Flesh Tones: Natural and consistent.  Detail is really high on close ups.  You can see the makeup on faces.  Phibes face looks super cool as you can make out all the textures and such.

Noise/Artifacts:  Some specs and a nice healthy layer of grain.

Dr Phibes Rises Again 3

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  A really loud and proud track.  Any time there is a horn on screen or in the score this 2.0 track lights up your room.  Voices are loud and clear.  There are also some good low end sounds produced in the score from your front speakers as well.  Volumes are wonderfully thought out in the mix and some produce nice jumps while keeping everything balances and effects voice and score never steps on the others’ foot.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Audio is nice, loud and clear.  Even Price’s recorded voice is finely audible and at the forefront.

Dr Phibes Rises Again 4

Extras 

Theatrical Trailer (HD, 2:08)

Still Gallery – 75 images of posters, lobby cards and promotional shots.

Return Of The Fly 1

Return Of The Fly (1959) 

Phillipe Delambre wants to finish and perfect the work his father had done.  His father, being the man who created an atom transporter and unsuccessfully mixed his makeup with that of a fly.  Francois, Phillipe’s uncle refuses to help, but when funds run out for Phillipe he agrees to help finance the rest of it.  Little does Phillipe know that there is some foul play going on among his researchers as one is an industrial spy looking to steal his secrets and is willing to kill to accomplish his goal.

This second Fly film kind of reminds me of Rocky II in terms of being a sequel.  It feels like its here to make the “happier” ending for those who weren’t satisfied with the more glum or lowered satisfaction/success of the original’s ending.  A lot of this is just new details and a couple different avenues taken that sort of mask the same sort of goal as the first film had.  In an odd choice, this film is now in black and white when the first one was in color.  But the sets seem to look similar from what I could tell.

However, like Rocky II, this one is a pretty solid and good film in its own right.  It takes the concept of the first one and goes a little beyond it.  This story is no longer a flashback, so we really don’t know where its going to end up by the time it ends.  We also have more characters and a outside source of villainy in addition to our tragic Fly monster.  While this film may not move as well as the first one and lacks the suspense and intrigue, its still a pretty good grounded 50s monster movie.  There’s also a third film in the series that was releases in 1965, Curse Of The Fly(also black and white) which takes the experimenting to another level, but I’ve not seen that one.

Return Of The Fly 3

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Clarity/Detail:  This is a softer image, that looks a bit too smooth.  Detail is very light.  The fly creature itself does look pretty impressive as well as the lab when its well lit.  This source they got the transfer on doesn’t look like it provided much to begin with though.

Depth:  Average.  There are some scenes outdoor that feature a good amount of dimensional work.  Most of it is in tight indoor spaces.

Black Levels:  Blacks a pretty rich and graying.  There is some crushing and detail is a little harder to make out on people and items featuring the color.

Color Reproduction: N/A

Flesh Tones: N/A

Noise/Artifacts: Specs throughout and a heavier layer of grain than the other black and white films in this set.

Return Of The Fly 2

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  Audio pretty much just does the trick.  It features good balance between score, voice and effects.  Its not incredibly intricate but does have some great moments with the score taking charge.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Crisp and clean.

Return Of The Fly 4

Extras

Audio Commentary

  • With Actor Brett Halsey And Film Historian David Del Valle

Theatrical Trailer And TV Spot (HD, 2:39)

Still Gallery – 18 posters, lobby cards and promotional images.

House On Haunted Hill 2

House On Haunted Hill (1959) 

Millionaire Frederick Loren is throwing a party for his fourth wife.  They’ve invited five guests to a house that is reportedly haunted to stay a night.  Loren and his wife don’t know any of the guests either.  Frederick has a plan.  Whoever survives the night or just merely stays the night there will be awarded $10,000.  After explaining the rules, he hands out pistols for them for their own protection against whatever ghoulish things may happen to them.  Things take a turn of the worst when Annabelle, Frederick’s wife is found dead by hanging herself.

This is one of the most famous of films from William Castle.  Castle was the guy who used to have heightened experience with theatrical viewings of his films.  For this one during certain scenes he would pulley down dancing skeletons to jolt his audiences.  One thing in particular with Castle and House On Haunted Hill, is that it feels rather a personal thing as its about an eccentric man throwing a party at a haunted house with fake scares and setups for his guests just as Castle would have done in theaters for his screenings.

This one really does hold up pretty well.  There is some truly scary imagery in the film that, I think by the assist of being in black and white still works effectively.  The film also doubles as both a horror/haunted house film and a murder mystery at the same time.  House On Haunted Hill features plenty of twists and turns keeping you always guessing at what to believe or who to suspect.  You’re always wondering if what you saw is really what you saw.  Price is delight here as he plays a role pretty iconic to him.  William Castle’s film is a classic spookfest and is one that is worthy of that horror rotation people go through every fall.

House On Haunted Hill 4

Video 

Encoding: MPEG-4 AVC

Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1

Clarity/Detail:  The best this film has ever looked for sure.  There is a good amount of detail on display.  The mens’ suit jackets contain patterns and textures that are easy to make out.  There are a few soft or blurry shots in the fold, but this is a rather solid image, with some minor blocking issues during really dark scenes but that’s about it.

Depth:  Some solid work on foreground and background characters.  Not very many super blurry backgrounds present.

Black Levels:  Blacks are nice and varied.  Keeping dark where need be with a very minimal loss of detail.  Also black clothing and surfaces are easy to make out details.

Color Reproduction: N/A

Flesh Tones:  Close ups provide plenty of detail and the medium shots impress as well.

Noise/Artifacts:  There are some graineir parts than others and light specs throughout.  Its a rather well kept image.

House On Haunted Hill 3

Audio 

Audio Format(s): English 2.0 DTS-HD MA

Subtitles: English

Dynamics:  Vocals and effect sound rather clean and crisp.  Sometimes the score can sound a little muffled or soft in the mix.  Doors handles turns, doors closing and all kinds of foley effects sound rather fresh and modern on this track.  There’s a good balance of sound and everything is placed accurately to match onscreen activity.

Low Frequency Extension: N/A

Surround Sound Presentation: N/A

Dialogue Reproduction:  Dialogue is loud and crisp.

House On Haunted Hill 1

Extras 

Audio Commentary

  • With Author/Historian Steve Haberman

Theatrical Trailer (HD, 1:40)

Vincent Price: Renaissance Man (HD, 27:20) – An extra ported over from a previous release that has experts discussing the upbringing and life of Vincent Price.

The Art Of Fear (HD, 12:13) – This one has experts focusing in on Price’s horror career.

Working With Vincent Price (HD, 15:26) – Discussion on what a generous actor he was to his co-stars and filmmakers.

Introductory Price (HD, 13:26) – This is the exact same featurette found on the previous Vincent Price Collection, discussion his shooting of the introductions and final words for the Iowa PBS series.

Still Gallery – 23 posters, lobby cards and promotional images.

Vincent Price Trailer Collection (HD, 23:48) – House Of Wax, Tales Of Terror, The Conqueror Worm, The Abominable Dr. Phibes, House Of Usher, The Haunted Palace, The Masque Of Red Death, Pit And The Pendulum, The Tingler, The Fly

Vincent Price 1

Summary 

Once again, Scream Factory has put together a terrific marathon of a set based around one of horror’s most beloved and legendary actors.  This particular edition features some more commercial named films or sequels to more well known works of the master.  Vincent Price Collection II is a seamless companion to the first set and a definite inclusion to your collection.  Halloween season and these Vincent Price sets now feel a marvelous tradition and I hope there’s enough to keep these up.  If they run out of price, they could always move to another actor like Peter Cushing or someone to base a set around.  This set is a real treat, do not miss out.

Vincent Price Collection II-Blu-ray

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Writer/Reviewer, lifelong obsessive film nerd. As eager to educate in the world of film as I am to learn. An avid lover of horror, schlock and trash, Brandon hosts the Cult Cinema Cavalcade podcast on the Creative Zombie Studios Network (www.cultcinemacavalcade.com) You can also find more essays on his blog Naptown Nerd (naptownnerd.blogspot.com).

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